War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0472

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Page 472
THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

The reserve was formed in a skirting of timber, where the enemy having got a section of artillery into position, we were for a time exposed to its fire, and I had 2 men wounded with fragments of shell. Nothing of importance transpired again until the evening of Thursday, May 19, when near Cass Station we encountered the enemy again. My regiment in supporting the Seventeenth Kentucky on the skirmish line had 1 man mortally and 2 severely wounded. May 23, we marched from Cass Station, crossed the Etowah River at 4 p.m., and proceeded on in the direction of Dallas. On the 26th, after crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek, the scene of the fight of the Twentieth Army Corps the evening previous, our lines were formed for battle, and I had 1 man killed in getting into position. Nothing of especial interest occurred in which my command was engaged until about 4 p.m., the next day, May 27, when we encountered the enemy near Pickett's Mills, some three miles north of Dallas, after a fatiguing march over a rough, densely wooded country. My regiment was in the first line of the attacking column of the brigade, with the Seventeenth Kentucky on its left. Two of my companies, viz, C and H, were not engaged, having been thrown out on the skirmish line during the march, and in the confusion incidental thereto separated from their command, and did not rejoin it until about mid-night. The position occupied by the enemy was a ridge running parallel to our line of march of this afternoon, and our advance had to be made over ground most unfavorable; dense woods, tangled vines, rocks and ravines impeded our way at every step; but we pushed on under a murderous fire, never halting for a moment until within about twenty yards of the crest of the ridge, when we found ourselves under a formidable line of defenses from which the enemy poured a deadly of musketry and artillery. We had suffered severely in getting to this position, but once there were comparatively safe, shielded by the slope of the hill. A battery on the right, where our lines had failed to advance, enfiladed our lines and occasioned us some loss. We remained in this position until our ammunition was exhausted and all hopes of re-enforcements despaired of, so at 10 p.m. when the enemy charged our lines we fell back, firing our last round of ammunition upon the advancing foe. Arriving at the point where our lines had been formed in the afternoon, we joined the rest of the brigade, and went into bivouac some half a mile to the right about midnight. Our casualties in this engagement embraced Captain Samuel W. McCulloch, Company D, mortally wounded; Second Lieutenant James Thompson, Company F, severely wounded; 5 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded; 26 enlisted men wounded; 26 enlisted men missing in action, making an aggregate loss of 59 out of about 200 engaged. On the morning of the 31st we advanced our lines about a half a mile, and began to throw up breast-works; while thus engaged the enemy made a spirited assault upon our whole line, but the reserves of the skirmish line checked their advance and we completed our works. The morning of Sunday, June 5, disclosed the enemy gone from our front, and the next day we took up our line of march in the direction of Acworth Station, where we bivouacked and remained until the morning of June 10, when we marched toward Marietta. Our movements from this to the 21st instant were very slow, the advance being made by parallels, driving the enemy from one position to another, line upon line of most formidable works marking the course of their retreat. I had 2 men killed on the 18th by solid shot from a battery



Page 472
THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.