War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0466

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Page 466
THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

marches the distance between McDonald's Station and Catoosa Springs was made by the evening of the 4th of May. There we rested on the 5th and 6th, and on the morning of the 7th moved in the direction of Tunnel Hill, the enemy having given ground before other troops in advance of us, and passed over Tunnel Hill and took position before Rocky Face Ridge. There the brigade encamped, and this regiment was sent to the front upon outpost duty, and on the 8th advanced up the side of Rocky Face as skirmishers, and were supported by the Thirteenth Ohio Regiment Veteran Volunteer Infantry. On the 9th the regiment was relieved and returned to the base of the ridge, but afterward made frequent moves to the right and left, co-operating with other troops in making demonstrations against the enemy, who occupied the crest of the ridge, and whose stray shots were quite annoying to the troops. One man of my regiment was severely wounded, and it seemed wonderful that many more were not killed and wounded, for the fire from the enemy was almost incessant. On the evening of the 12th this regiment moved with the division to the left in the direction of Varnell's Station, some three miles, to meet an attack apprehended from that point; hastily made defensive works, but the attack was not made. Just before it became dark the regiment was sent back to do outpost duty in front of our old position. On the morning of the 13th, at daylight, I discovered that the enemy had evacuated the ridge during the night, and shortly afterward received an order from headquarters of the brigade, which had remained on the left some three miles distant, to move in the direction of Dalton, through Buzzard Roost Gap, while the brigade would move in the same direction but to the east of Rocky Face. The brigade came up with us at Dalton and moved to a point some eight miles south of that place, where it remained for the night. On the 14th we came up with the enemy near Resaca, but the brigade, being held in reserve, did not participate in the engagement there. On the night of the 15th the enemy evacuated his position at Resaca, and on the morning of the 16th we pursued, passing through his works and camped in the evening near Calhoun. On the 17th the march was continued until we found the enemy strongly intrenched in position across the railroad, covering the approach to Adairsville. Brisk skirmishing was kept up for three or four hours and until after dark. During that night the enemy withdrew, and we followed on the morning of the 18th and camped in the evening four miles from Kingston. We passed that place on the morning of the 19th and came up with the enemy near Cassville. Here I was ordered to send out three companies of my regiment as skirmishers and another as flankers and did so. The enemy resisted the advance of the skirmishers very stubbornly, and had the advantage of the cover of a thick growth of small timber. I was ordered to re-enforce the skirmishers from time to time, until my whole regiment was thus engaged in front of the brigade. We continued to drive the enemy's skirmishers until they were apparently much strengthened by re-enforcements, and until they certainly occupied much higher ground than we did and placed themselves behind strong barricades made of fence rails. A rapid fire was kept up by us until perhaps an hour after dark. At the end of that time I was ordered to cease firing and retire all of my regiment, except a thin skirmish line, which I did. Until I received this order I had received no orders, except the ones which brought the whole of my regiment into the skirmish line. We could not see the



Page 466
THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.