War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0462 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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Knefler, we moved about one mile to the right of the brigade, and went into camp, throwing up a line of works, a few rebels being seen in our front. On the morning of the 9th the regiment went on picket, no enemy being seen in our front. On the morning of the 10th the regiment was withdrawn from picket, and orders issued to be in readiness to march. About 8 a.m. we moved with the brigade about six miles to our left up the river, and went into camp near the Chattahoochee. On the 11th we remained in camp inactive. On the 12th I received orders to march, and at 12 o'clock moved with the brigade one mile south, and crossed the Chattahoochee on pontoons. Went into camp with the brigade, and put up a line of works, the Seventy-ninth Indiana being on our right and the Fifty-ninth Ohio on the left. On the 13th we received orders to march. About 11 o'clock we moved with the brigade about one mile to the right, and put up a line of works, the Seventy-ninth Indiana on the right and Seventeenth Kentucky on our left; advanced about 100 yards. We remained in camp inactive until July 17, when, by order of Colonel Knefler, we moved down the river to within a mile of Pace's Ferry. I was left with the Ninth Kentucky and Seventy-ninth Indiana to guard the left flank of the division, while it moved to Pace's Ferry. I threw out pickets on our front and left, running to the river. The brigade returning about 6 o'clock, we were withdrawn, and returned to the camp we left in the morning. Received orders from brigade headquarters to be ready to march, and on the morning of the 18th, about 7 o'clock, we moved with the brigade about four miles to Buck Head, on the Atlanta road, and went on picket.

On the morning of July 19 the regiment was withdrawn from picket and ordered to march, by Colonel Knefler, without tents or knapsacks. About 7 o'clock we moved with the brigade to Peach Tree Creek, the advance regiment of the brigade skirmishing all the way. On arriving within a short distance of Peach Tree Creek I was directed by Colonel Knefler to take the Seventy-ninth Indiana and my regiment and move to the right of the road a few hundred yards and await orders. We moved out to an open field, where we had a full view of the enemy's position. The Atlanta road crosses the creek, where it makes a short bend to the left, and then runs for some distance parallel to the creek about 400 yards; and about 150 yards from it on the right bank is a knoll or piece of high ground, which completely commands the opposite bank. I was ordered to move with the Seventy-ninth Indiana and get possession of this bank, leaving the Ninth Kentucky in the skirt of a woods on the right of the road. On ascending the knoll I discovered two heavy lines of the enemy's skirmishers on the opposite side of the creek advancing toward the position I was ordered to occupy. On perceiving us they fell back. I placed the Seventy-ninth Indiana in position facing the creek, and threw up a barricade of rails. The enemy occupied a skirt of woods on the left bank, apparently in some force. In several places their works could be seen distinctly. I reported to Colonel Kneffler and was ordered to hold the position. Our skirmishers were briskly engaged with those of the enemy for several hours, when I received orders to cross the creek at the point where the Seventy-ninth Indiana lay, with the Seventy-ninth Indiana and Ninth Kentucky. I accordingly directed Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, of the Ninth Kentucky to move into position on the left of the Seventy-ninth Indiana. Fifth skirmishers were thrown out from each regi-