War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0455 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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teers on the left and the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers on the right, and fortify it at a point about three miles northeast of Atlanta, Ga. In fortifying the position the regiment was exposed to a constant fire from the enemy's skirmish pits and sustained considerable loss in enlisted men. As the enemy vacated their works in our front during the night of the 21st, the regiment moved with the brigade on the morning of the 22d. In the afternoon of the same day the regiment was ordered to take and fortify a position, in line with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers on the left and the Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers on the right, about one mile and a half north of Atlanta, Ga. From that date until the 25th of August there was a continual skirmish between the pickets, and as the regiment had a daily detail on picket duty it sustained a slight loss in enlisted men. On the evening of August 25 the regiment was ordered by the brigade commander to abandon the works and move with the brigade. The regiment was with the brigade in all of the movements succeeding the above date, but was engaged in no skirmishes or actions requiring special notice until September 2.

On the morning of September 2, just a daylight, Captain John G. Dunbar, who was commanding the regiment, was captured by the enemy while establishing a picket-line near Jonesborough, Ga., and I was ordered by Colonel Knefler, commanding the brigade, to take command of the regiment. In the afternoon the brigade, to take command of the regiment. In the afternoon of the same day, near Lovejoy's Station, Ga., I was ordered to form the regiment in the front line of the brigade, with the Ninth Kentucky Volunteers on the left and Nineteenth Ohio Volunteers on the right. The line was ordered to advance upon the enemy, and after advancing about one-half mile came upon their works. Orders were received to charge their works and were promptly obeyed, but the movement failed to be successful. The officers and men behaved gallantly in the charge, but, as they were unable to carry the works, they fell back a short distance to the cover of timber, where the regiment was reformed, and during the night, as ordered by the brigade commander, threw up a line of works. In the action Adjutant Thompson Dunn was killed, Quartermaster Jacob H. Colclazer, acting aide-de-camp to Colonel Knefler, was severely wounded, and 5 enlisted men wounded. The loss in the regiment was very light, considering. The engagement, though very short, was very severe. On the evening of September 5 I received orders from the brigade commander to vacate the works at 8 o'clock of the same evening and move with the brigade in the direction of Atlanta, Ga. On the afternoon of September 8 I was ordered by Colonel Knefler, commanding the brigade, to go into camp with the regiment in the present location, two miles east of Atlanta, Ga.

The conduct of the officers of the regiment during the entire campaign has been worthy of great praise, and the enlisted men have behaved in the most soldier-like manner under all and the most trying circumstances.

The regiment entered upon the campaign on the 3rd day of May with 3 field, 4 staff, and 13 line officers, and 300 enlisted men effective for duty, but went into the present camp on the 8th day of September with 2 staff (doctors) and 7 line officers and 163 enlisted men, including several men who have rejoined for duty from hospitals in the rear since the campaign began. This loss includes the killed, wounded, and sick.