War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0422 Chapter L. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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until the 9th, when, to make a diversion in favor of other troops, the brigade in two lines moved up one of the slopes of Rocky Face Ridge to within 100 yards of the summit. Our losses to-day were quite severe. We remained in front of Buzzard Roost until the 13th, when we passed through to Dalton, four miles distant, the enemy having retreated the previous night. We followed, striking his cavalry about 10 a. m. on the 14th four miles in front of Resaca. Forming in two lines, the troops moved forward for about two miles, when we came upon the left wing of the Twenty-third Corps sharply engaged with the enemy, which we relieved; and Colonel Payne, One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, commanding his own regiment and the Ninety-third Ohio Volunteers, pushed forward, vigorously driving the enemy from their advanced position, and seizing a hill within 100 yards of a salient in his works, containing a battery and overlooking a portion of his line containing two other batteries, the horses of which were shot and the guns kept silent the remainder of the time he occupied this position. Lieutenant-Colonel Kimberly, Forty-first Ohio Volunteers, commanding his regiment and the First Ohio Volunteers, was sent in on Colonel Payne's right, giving us complete control of the enemy's position for several hundred yards, and by putting sharpshooters at work the men and horses of the enemy that showed themselves were shot; General Willich moving in connection with my right and General Stanley with my left and the line fortified. These operations were effected with a loss of not to exceed 60 men. On the 15th an assault of the enemy's works was ordered in conjunction with an advance by General Hooker. At the signal this brigade moved over the works and toward the enemy, but the troops on the right and left hesitating, the entire fire of the enemy was concentrated upon my command, which was staggered, and as I could see no support ordered them back. The losses of the brigade in this unassisted and honest effort in the space of thirty seconds was 120. At about 10 p. m. the enemy opened a noisy fire all along our front, and during the confusion withdrew his artillery and later his infantry. In the morning a regiment, under Colonel Kimberly, and the skirmish line being moved forward to the Oostenaula River, picked up about 100 of the enemy. I would call attention to the accompanying sketch* of the position just described; also to the meritorious conduct of Colonel Payne in seizing the position already occupied by the enemy, and Lieutenant-Colonel Kimberly in assisting to make it secure. In the attempt to assault the greatest bravery and coolness was manifested by the entire command, but particularly by Colonel W. W. Berry, Fifth Kentucky Infantry, and Lieutenant and Adjt. J. J. Siddall, Sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. On the morning of the 16th the brigade moved through Resaca in the direction of Calhoun, and on the 17th to within one mile of Adairsville, skirmishing a portion of the way, and finding there the enemy drawn up to check our farther progress, causing us also to form in line. Some skirmishing took place with small loss. The enemy having withdrawn during the night, we moved on through Adairsville and Kingston, coming upon him in front of Cassville about midday the 19th. The command formed in line and moved cautiously forward to within a half mile of Cassville, the enemy retiring to that place, where he made dispositions for battle.

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* See p. 426.

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