War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0284 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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the late campaign in Georgia, commencing from the date of its transfer to the Third Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, August 16, 1864, under command of Brigadier General William Grose:

After the transfer to the Third Brigade, my command occupied the extreme left of the brigade line, in front of Atlanta. Nothing further transpired than the usual duties of skirmishing with the enemy until the 20th day of August, 1864, during which time my command did not sustain any loss. On the morning of the 20th of August, by order of Brigadier General William Grose, I moved my command, in conjunction with five regiments of the Third Brigade, tot he left. About sunrise we came upon the enemy. I was ordered to send two companies out as skirmishers, which I did, sending Companies K and F. Afterwards, on the same occasion, I was ordered to send out another company, with a detail of thirty-five men as skirmishers, which did promptly, sending Company B and the detail on the right of the brigade skirmish line. My command did not suffer any loss during the scout on the 20th of August. Lieutenant J. S. Fisher and Private Clemard Mahoney, Company E, were wounded on the 20th of August while on the skirmish line in front of the regimental camp. My command laid in camp near Atlanta from the 20th to the night of the 25th of August, doing nothing but furnishing the required number of guards for the regimental front, not sustaining any loss. On the night of the 25th of August, by order of Brigadier General William Grose, I moved my command under cover of night, immediately after dark in such a manner as to deceive the enemy as to my purpose, moving to the right of our lines, marching until 3 o'clock on the morning of the 26th, at which time my command was halted and told to rest until morning. By order of the general commanding I had my command ready to move at 8 a. m., at which time the enemy attacked our skirmish line. I was then ordered to move my regiment under cover of a little hill which I was ordered to hold at all hazards, which I did until relieved, without firing a gun. Then, by order of the general commanding brigade, I moved my regiment to the right through the lines of the Sixteenth Army Corps. Went into camp at sunset. Moved my command with the brigade at 8 a. m. August 27, marched until hill which I was ordered to hold at all hazards, which I did until relieved, without firing a Gun. Then, by order of the general commanding brigade, I moved my regiment to the right through the lines of the Sixteenth Army Corps. Went into camp at sunset. Moved my command with the brigade at 8 a. m. August 27, marched until about 12 m., at which time my regiment was formed in line of battle on the right of the front line of the brigade, which was in rear of the Third Division, Fourth Army Corps, near Camp Creek, Ga. My command was ordered to be ready to move at 7 a. m. August 28. Moved at 2 p. m. with the brigade; went into camp at sundown. My regiment was formed in line of battle in center of the front line of the brigade. On the morning of the 29th of August the general commanding ordered me to throw up a line of breast-works on the left of the front line of the brigade.

On the morning of the 30th I was ordered to move my regiment with the brigade at 6 a. m. Moved to the right, crossing the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. After marching to the right about five miles I was ordered to send a company out as flankers. The enemy fired on my command in the evening, wounding 1 man, the orderly, Company B. Marched until sunset, was ordered by the commanding general to form line of battle in the center of the front line of the brigade, and throw up a temporary line of breast-works, which was immediately done. Moved with the brigade at 6 a. m. August 31, by command of Brigadier General William Grose. Moved about one and