War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0184 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, MEDICAL DIRECTOR'S OFFICE,

Atlanta, Ga., September 15, 1864.

Major General G. H. THOMAS,

Commanding Department of the Cumberland:

SIR: Herewith I forward a tabular statement of casualties in the Army of the Cumberland from May 1, 1864, to September 6, 1864.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. COOPER,

Surgeon, U. S. Army, Medical Director.

[Inclosure.]

Tabular statement of number and disposition of sick and wounded in the Army of the Cumberland, from May 1 to September 6, 1864.

Command Sick Wounded Sent Returned Died Died

to the to duty from from

rear disease wound

s

Fourth 13,456 5,852 8,716 10,301 17 416

Army

Corps

Fourteent 7,461 3,973 7,196 3,031 88 250

h Army

Corps

Twentieth 15,611 5,375 8,756 11,106 63 374

Army

Corps

Cavalry 6,625 359 1,516 5,425 39 27

Corps

Total 43,153 15,559 16,184 29,863 207 1,067

GEO. E. COOPER,

Surg., U. S. Army, Medical Director, Dept. of the Cumberland.

ATLANTA, GA., September 15, 1864.

Numbers 9.

Reports of Brigadier General John M. Brannan, U. S. Army, Chief of Artillery.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF ARTY., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Atlanta, Ga., September 14, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit the reports of corps chiefs of artillery and battery commanders of the operations of the artillery arm of the service in your army during the campaign resulting in the capture of the city of Atlanta:

In forwarding these reports I will bear witness to the efficiency and valuable services performed by the artillery of your army during the entire campaign. Heavy losses were inflicted upon the rebels by the accuracy of our fie, the skillful and daring positions taken by our batteries, frequently on the skirmishers line, within short canister range of strongly intrenched works of the enemy. That it has been most destructive, we have not only the evidence of what we ourselves witnessed, but also that of the enemy.

The chiefs of artillery of corps have shown energy, efficiency, skill, and courage equal to any officers in the service. I call your attention to the reports of corps chiefs relative to subordinates. Captain A. Sutermeister, Eleventh Indiana Battery, being attached to your headquarters under your own supervision, you are aware of the efficient and zealous manner he and his company have performed their part in the campaign, both with the 20-pounder Parrotts and 4 1/2-inch guns. The organization of the artillery into brigades under