War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0086 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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ADDENDA.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS.,

Numbers 62.

In the Field, near Lovejoy's,

September 3, 1864.

The general commanding announces with great pleasure that he has official information that our troops under Major- General Slocum occupied Atlanta yesterday at 11 a. m. the enemy having evacuated the night before, destroyed vast magazines of stores, and blowing up, among other things, eighty car- loads of ammunition, which accounts for the sounds heard by us on the night of the 1st instant. Our present task is, therefore, well done, and all work of destruction on the railroad will cease.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

L. M. DAYTON,

Aide- de- Camp.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

September 5, 1864- 10.25 p. m.

Major- General SHERMAN:

I have the pleasure of transmitting to you the following orders, which were made Saturday by the President on receipt of the news of the capture of Atlanta:

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

September 3, 1864.

The national thanks are tendered by the President to Major General W. T. Sherman and the gallant officers and soldiers of his command before Atlanta, for the distinguished ability, courage, and perseverance displayed in the campaign in Georgia, which, under Divine favor, has resulted in the capture of the city of Atlanta. The marches, battles, sieges, and other military operations that have signalized the campaign, must render it famous in the annals of war, and have entitled those who have participated therein to the applause and thanks of the nation.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

IN THE FIELD,

Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 6, 1864- 3 p. m.

(Received 11.05 p. m. 8th.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have just received your telegram, and shall announce it to the whole army, preceded by the expression, "The general commanding announces to the army with pride and satisfaction," and followed by "All corps, regiments, and batteries may, without further notice inscribe Atlanta on their colors." We are moving back to Atlanta slowly, making food use of the corn- fields, which our animals needed and to prevent a boast of the enemy that we were in a hurry. I have burned a good deal of cotton, but will save enough to pay the expenses of the salute.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major- General.