War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0763 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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send troops as soon as I get cars. My camp to-night will be six miles of this place. My first object is to destroy Hunter, and the next it is not prudent to trust to telegraph. Hold on and you will be amply supported. Is there telegraph communication with Richmond? See that there is no lack of energy in railroad management, and give me information from time to time.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, June 16, 1864-12.30 [p. m.]

General BRECKINRIDGE:

Let me know what the railroad agents can and will do. Everything depends upon promptness, energy, and dispatch. See that agents use all these, and if they fail take the most summary measures and impress everything that is necessary in the way of men or means to insure the object. I have authority to direct your movements, and I will take the responsibility of what you may find it necessary to do. I will hold all railroad agents and employees responsible with their lives for hearty co-operation with us. Be certain that Hunter's main force is east of the mountains else the most important part of the duty assigned me will be thwarted. I will communicate with you when the first train goes down. Keep in constant communication with telegraph office, as I will also do. I can hear of no enemy about Staunton. Hampton has defeated and driven back Sheridan's cavalry. Is there any enemy's cavalry north of Lynchburg?

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, June 16, 1864-2.20 p. m.

General JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE:

Dispatch of 1.15 received. I shall come as soon as trains from Lynchburg arrive. I cannot start sooner for fear of interruption on the road if trains start in both ways, besides my troops marched twenty miles to-day. General Robert Ransom has been assigned to command of Valley cavalry. Telegraph to Richmond for him at once. Where is your cavalry? If you can hold out till morning and the railroad does not fail all will be well. Do not trust too much to the energy of the superintendent. I have had to deal with him before.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, June 16, 1864.

(Received 4.45 p. m.)

General BRECKINRIDGE:

Your dispatches of 3 and 3.15 p. m. received. Unless I receive well authenticated information from other points requiring immediate attention I shall act in accordance with them.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.