War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0733 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

defense of the Virginia and East Tennessee Railroad. Notify General Lee of the order and explain to him the necessity which calls for this move and the reasons for sending it direct to Breckinridge. The movement should be prompt and rapid.

Yours, respectfully,

BRAXTON BRAGG.

RICHMOND, May 13, 1864.

(Received 1 a. m. 14th.)

Major General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Harrisonburg, Va.:

If you have no instructions from General Lee to conflict, send immediately an efficient brigade of infantry to Lynchburg to protect that place and to unite with McCausland in defense of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. The movement should be prompt and rapid. Acknowledge receipt, and reply by telegraph.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

NEW MARKET, VA., May 13, 1864-4 p. m.

General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Harrisonburg, Va.:

The enemy has fallen back from Mount Jackson, how far I have not ascertained. It was a cavalry advance from Woodstock. Prisoners captured to-day say the infantry and artillery were ready to move at 7 a. m. As they have not appeared they either remain at Woodstock or are retiring down the Valley. A column of cavalry appeared at Luray at 12 o'clock to-day, and are just now reported to be advancing midway between this place and Luray. A few hours will develop their purposes. If he comes on I will fight him here.

J. D. IMBODEN,

Brigadier-General.

General B.:

While writing this off the operator at New Market tells me it is reported in town that enemy can be seen on top of mountain crossing and he had left New Market. Suppose it is the column from Luray. He will likely establish an office to-night at Lacey Spring.

Respectfully,

TELEGRAPH OPERATOR.

NEW MARKET, VA., May 13, 1864.

General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Harrisonburg, Va.:

Enemy is advancing. He occupies Mount Jackson. My advance is at Rude's Hill. I will make a stand here against his cavalry, but if he gets up his infantry and artillery before re-enforcements reach me I shall be forced to retire. Lacey Spring, nine miles this side of Harrisonburg, is the next position in which we should have any advantage of ground. By what hour can I expect support here?

J. D. IMBODEN,

Brigadier-General.