War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0721 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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NARROWS, May 6, 1864.

Major-general BRECKINRIDGE:

There is no sign of any artillery coming to me. I do not expect any addition to my present force of 200 men for two or three days. We look for an attack in the morning. Did you get dispatch announcing that there would be no transportation for you at Jackson River Depot?

A. G. JENKINS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, &C.,

Narrows, May 6, 1864.

Major-General BRECKINRIDGE:

GENERAL: Since parting from you I have had an interview with Colonel McCausland. He has received a communication from Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, at Jeffersonville, which he handed to me. That communication states that the writer is in command of Brigadier General W. E. Jones' brigade, numbering 1,000 men. The writer mentions nothing of any other cavalry there, but the courier told Colonel McC. that there was no other cavalry there. Under these circumstances, and from what I learn of Colonel McC. of the force of the enemy, I thought it proper for me to write you the additional facts which I learned, and to state my conviction of my inability to defend this country if their estimate of the enemy's force advancing from the Kanawha Valley, and which is confirmed in the main through all the different channels, be correct.

I am, general, very respectfully, yours,

A. G. JENKINS,

Brigadier-General.

NARROWS, May 6, 1864.

Major General JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE:

The enemy drove Crawford out of Princeton at 10 o'clock this morning. Crawford fell back on the Tazewell road, leaving my front without a cavalry scout. I can hear nothing from Jones, and Rocky Gap lies open to admit enemy to my rear. I have 200 men, and it will be two or three days before I have more. Could you let Colonel McCausland's command stay a day or two longer here?

A. G. JENKINS,

Brigadier-General.

NARROWS, May 6, 1864-6.10 p. m.

Major CHARLES S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The enemy certainly occupy Princeton. The only mounted company I have fell beck on the wrong road, taking the one leading toward Tazewell, so that I am left with nothing but infantry pickets. As my brigade has not yet been collected, and all the infantry has been removed from this section, I have only 200 men present to defend this section of country, including Dublin Depot and the New

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