War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0711 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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SALTVILLE, May 3, 1864.

Major General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Dublin:

My brigades is now moving to Jeffersonville, where I go to-morrow. If the enemy is likely to advance soon I will retain General Morgan's command. I am afraid to get far from the road from Pound Gap, but will try to join you on any battle-field you may choose.

W. E. JONES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Abingdon, May 3, 1864.

Brigadier General A. E. JACKSON,

Commanding Brigade:

GENERAL: A reported movement of the enemy's cavalry from the direction of Kanawha renders it necessary to put much of the mounted force of the department in a position to cover the approaches on Saltville, and to render assistance to General Breckinridge, in case of necessity. You would do well to keep your scouts active in your front and your mounted pickets well to your front, as you will not probably meet with support west of Glade for several days. If you should be compelled to fall back, you will have to go depend on your own judgment, guided by future developments of the enemy, for the control and movements of troops immediately under you. For a few days I expect to be on the threatened front and too distant to give orders for such prompt movement as would be necessary if you should be required to act at all.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. E. JONES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Abingdon, May 3, 1864.

Colonel PRIDEMORE,

Commanding Sixty-fourth Virginia Regiment:

COLONEL: A reported movement of the enemy renders it necessary for you to take measures similar to those prescribed for you a few days since when the enemy was expected. Scout well in the direction of Pound Gap and the Louisa Fork of Sandy. Report any advance of the enemy to the troops on your left, to this place, and to Saltville. If you find the enemy has passed your right flank send your transportation in this direction and concentrate you force on the flank of the enemy, assailing him every opportunity, and following him up as long as the strength of your men and horses will admit of. Let two of your men move to you right until they find others guarding the country north and eases of you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. E. JONES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.