War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0682 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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that General Sigel has telegraphed him to remain at Parkersburg with his four companies until further orders. Please advise me how act; whether to send all to Martinsburg or the two companies from here to Parkersburg.

N. WILKINSON,

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, June 27, 1864.

Colonel WILKINSON,

Clarksburg:

Hold the two companies at Clarksburg until I can hear from General Sigel.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, June 27, 1864,

Colonel F. W. THOMPSON,

Green Spring:

Did your scouts go to Romney to-day? If so, did they learn anything of Mr. Brown's story? If they did not go why? This story has, in my opinion, been started by McNeill's men or the secesh to prevent your force from McNeill. Send a scout so as to arrive in the morning at Romney and learn all about this matter. Answer.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

BEVERLY, June 27, 1864.

Lieutenant FREDERICK A. NIMS,

Martinsburg, W. Va.:

Refugees from Hightown report parts of Imboden's and Jacksons' commands at Crab Bottom. They are expecting an advance from here; are cutting the trees along the road partially down so that they can be thrown quickly in case of necessity. We ought by all means to make a feint of advancing by the Staunton pike to prevent them from cutting off the cavalry that started to the White Sulphur Springs on yesterday.

T. M. HARRIS,

Colonel, Commanding.

BEVERLY, June 27, 1864.

Major-General SIGEL:

I have arrived here with my command in charge of a train of sick and wounded, and 142 prisoners assigned to Wheeling from General Hunter's command. Have marched twenty-four days and three nights. My command is worn down and almost shoeless. I will await your orders.

Respectfully,

DAVID PUTNAM,

Colonel 152nd Ohio National Guard, Commanding.