War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0681 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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CUMBERLAND, June 27, 1864.

Major MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Your telegram received. I will send an officer to investigate and report in regard to the capture at Springfield yesterday. I fear it will turn out a great disgraceful affair. It is reported that the men had turned out a great disgraceful to graze, and a large number of the men were in the river bathing when attacked. It was, as I expected, McNeill's and Harness' men, under command of McNeill himself, who had just returned from the Shenandoah Valley. Loss about 60 men and 100 horses, with equipments, &c.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, June 27, 1864.

(Received 28th.)

Major MEYSENBURG:

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Colonel Thompson reports from Green Spring that a Union woman came into his camp to-day and reports a cavalry force on Lost River, and that they intend to make an attack on Cumberland or New Creek. If there is any truth in this report it must be the force that has been up the Shenandoah Valley about Mount Jackson. I also received the following this evening from Colonel Wilkinson:

CLARKSBURG, June 27, 1864.

Brigadier-General KELLEY:

The following just received from Major Simpson, Eleventh Virginia Infantry, Parkersburg:"I have reliable information that there are about seventy-five rebels on Yellow Creek, Calhoun County, and a number in the Burning Springs region."

N. WILKINSON,

Colonel.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, June 27, 1864-11 a.m.

Major MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

On the 17th, in obedience to your orders, I ordered Major Simpson, of the Eleventh Virginia Infantry, to proceed with his four companies, two of which were at Parkersburg one at Glenville, in Gilmer County, the other at Weston, in Lewis County, and report to you without delay at Martinsburg. I supposed this order had been executed, but this a.m. I received the following telegram from Colonel Wilkinson. May I suggest that the two companies now at Clarksburg be permitted to remain there for the present instead of proceeding to Parkersburg, as they may be required to expel guerrilla bands in that neighborhood.

CLARKSBURG, June 27, 1864.

Brigadier-General KELLEY:

Two companies of the Eleventh Virginia Infantry are at Parkersburg and two will arrive here to-night from the interior. I ordered Major Simpson to start by rail to-morrow and take up the companies here for Martinsburg. He answered