War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0668 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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night all have crossed. Night before last were concentrating for a move in some direction, no one knows where. I have no faith in this, but think perhaps the guerrillas have all concentrated in a body of try and capture or attack your train which starts for General Hunter.

MAX WEBER,

Brigadier-General,

HEADQUARTERS

Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 23, 1864.

Colonel W. P. MAULSBY,

Commanding Post, Martinsburg:

The detachments of cavalry at Duffield's and Kearneysville, which relieved the Sixth Virginia Mounted Rifles, will break camp and march to Martinsburg, Va., at 3 a.m. to-morrow, and report to T. A. Meysenburg, assistant adjutant-general. They will be relieved by detachment from this post.

By order of Brigadier General Max Weber, commanding.

H. W. PITCHER,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS,

Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 23, 1864.

Colonel W. P. MAULSBY,

Commanding Post, Martinsburg:

It is impossible to send detachments of cavalry from this post to relieve the detachments at Duffield's and Kearneysville. You will order the detachments to move at 3 a.m. to-morrow, as ordered in telegram. Cavalry will be sent you as soon as possible. You will instruct the infantry at Duffield's and Kearneysville to be vigilant and on the alert.

By order of Brigadier General Max Weber, commanding.

H. W. PITCHER,

Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS POST,

Charleston, W. Va., June 23, 1864.

Major JOHN S. WITCHER,

Commanding Third West Virginia Cavalry:

SIR: Your communication of the 22nd instant is received, and in reply will say that you have permission to remove your command from Hurricane to Coalsmouth. Upon arriving there you will send the company of infantry stationed there to Hurricane Bridge. I will have in a few days a sufficient supply of horses to mount all the cavalry commands in the Valley. In reference to the civil authorities arresting a soldier of your command depends entirely upon the nature of the case. You can make a statement of the facts connected with the case and forward it to these headquarters. If the contingencies of the service will permit you can visit Charleston in a few days. I wish to have a personal interview with you.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. McILRATH,

Major, Commanding Post.