War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0658 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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HDQRS. FIRST CAV. DIV., DEPT., OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Catawba Mountain, Va., June 21, 1864.

Major General D. HUNTER,

Commanding Department of West Virginia:

SIR: I have the honor to state that the rod up the mountain is blockaded for about four miles. We have removed about half of it. A small squad of the enemy was found in the gap. The retreated by the road leading to Fincastle. I have ordered that the Fincastle road by heavily blockaded. The road we are on is said to have bee blockaded by militia and negroes. The white men belonged to a factory on the summit of the mountain. I shall destroy it. It will be important for me to know the next gap through which we pass, as soon as possible, so that I can send forward and occupy it. The road up the mountain is rough and will be very difficult for artillery and the train. I have noticed, in passing the train, many worthless wagons, which might be thrown out and the horses used to assist the artillery.

I am, general, very respectfully, &c.,

A. N. DUFFIE,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HDQRS. FIRST CAV. DIV., DEPT., OF WEST VIRGINIA,

In the Field, June 21, 1864.

Brigadier General W. W. AVERELL:

SIR: Have sent out on all roads three or four miles. They are out now. My advance on New Castle road is skirmishing.

Very respectfully, &c.,

A. N. DUFFIE,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS

Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 21, 1864.

Major MEYSENBURG, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The arms for the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry have not yet arrived. I cannot relieve the detachment sent from Martinsburg.

MAX WEBER.

Brigadier-General.

POINT OF ROCKS., June 21, 1864.

Captain H. M. BURLEIGH, Assistant Adjutant-General:

This command has gone on a scout in Loudoun County. Will report this evening.

DANL. M. KEYES,

Captain.

BALTIMORE, June 21, 1864

Brigadier General MAX WEBER, Harper's Ferry:

Philadelphia Inquirer and other papers say Mosby and 200 or 300 horsemen have crossed Potomac northward at Falling Waters or vicinity. Is there the slightest foundation for this statement?

W. P. SMITH.