War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0651 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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Staunton and Lexington, in Hunter's rear, and have returned without being able to reach him or ascertain his whereabouts. I hardly think it possible that General Stahel, who was sent back for ammunition, can return to him, even if he knew where Hunter is. He, however, will make the attempt, hopeless as it appears. If the enemy's force, as reported, is superior to Hunter's his only escape will be into West Virginia, or by crossing the James and reaching you on the south side. The latter is very possible for cavalry, but extremely perilous for infantry. It is hardly possible to get any communication to him from this side.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

CITY POINT, VA., June 19, 1864-6.30 p.m.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

General Sheridan having returned without forming a junction with General Hunter, another diversion may become necessary for the protection of the latter. I wish, therefore, you would direct General Sheridan to remain at White House and await further orders. His horses require rest, which they can get as well at White House as here. His stock of ammunition ought to be replenished at the same time his orders go to him. Two army gun-boats were sent from here yesterday to keep the river clear from West Point to White House.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 19, 1864-10 p.m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

The Richmond Examiner of yesterday says Hunter on Thursday last was at Forest Depot, on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, destroying that road. Forest Depot is supposed to be where the railroad crosses Forest Creek, some eight or ten miles southwest from Lynchburg, and appears to be on the road from Lexington. I will send you the paper to-morrow if you have not seen it. General Beauregard in reply to my application to remove the dead and wounded, declines on the ground that he sees no occasion from recent operations, for such a request but will be willing to acceded to it after a general battle. I have reason to believe there are but few wounded not brought off, but some dead of both armies unburied. The casualties for the 16th, 17th, and 18th will amount to about 7,000 in all.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General., Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA, Numbers 116.

Otter Creek, Va., June 19, 1864.

1. Brigadier General W. W. Averell will report immediately in person at these headquarters for confidential instructions.