War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0581 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The detachment is in perfect health, and there is no doubt but that its work will be appreciated by the officers in command in this department.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. B. ROE,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer, Dept. of Washington.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. HASKIN'S DIV., 22nd ARMY CORPS, No. 61.

DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON, June 2, 1864.

1. Battery G, Third U. S. Artillery, First Lieutenant Pendleton commanding, having reported for duty at these headquarters, is hereby assigned to Fort Bunker Hill, and will report without delay, to Colonel Hayward, at that post.

2. Colonel Hayward, commanding First Brigade, will direct one company of the One hundred and fiftieth Ohio National Guard to move without delay from Fort Bunker Hill to Fort Lincoln. Battery G, Third U. S. Artillery, will relieve the company sent to Fort Lincoln.

By order of Colonel Haskin:

R. CHANDLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Wheeling, June 2, 1864.

Major-General HUNTER,

Commanding Department of West Virginia:

GENERAL: The counties between the Great Kanawha and Big Sandy Rivers, in the southern part of the State, have been infested with large bodies of guerrillas from the beginning of the rebellion, but the loyal people have had some little protection from U. S. soldier stationed in those counties by order of the several commanders of the department. With what protection there has bee it has been difficult to keep up county organization for the execution of civil law, even in counties immediately on the Ohio River, yet in these counties the courts have been held (irregularly) and some taxes collected. In the back counties (toward the mountains) there has been no civil organization for three years. There are gentlemen here now from Cabell County, who bid for protection, if it be possible, so that they can remain at their homes in safety. They inform me that the troops which have been stationed in their county, and who have given some protection to the loyal people of the counties of Cabell and Wayne, have been withdrawn within a few days past, and that they are now left to the mercy of the guerrillas.

They further state that in these counties there are from 300 to 400 guerrillas, under the command of three rebel captains, who are robbing the people of their property, and capturing and carrying off some of the loyal citizens, and are imprisoning and otherwise maltreating them. On the 17th of May Mr. John Adams, whom I heretofore had employed enrolling the militia, was captured and carried off, and has been either killed or imprisoned, probably the