War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0553 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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so opposed to military discipline and usages of war, has rendered it necessary to withdraw guards from all houses outside of my camp, thus leaving peaceable citizens to suffer from pillage, which can be prevented in no other way.

Respectfully, &c.,

WM. W. AVERELL,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May 29, 1864-8 a.m.

Major T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

A messenger arrived at New Creek this a.m. at 3 o'clock from Greenland Gap, with report from Major Huntley that the enemy (Imboden and McNeill) had arrived at Petersburg with four regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, and that they were to attack the force at Greenland Gap this a.m. A few hours will develop the truth or falsity of this report. In the mean time I have ordered Colonel Wilkinson to detain the One Hundred and fifty-second Regiment until we get further news. I send scouts out at once.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May 29, 1864-10 p.m.

Major T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

Heard from my scouts sent from there at Burlington. He had found no enemy, nor could hear of any. He has pushed on toward Petersburg. I am impressed with the belief that the reported force is only McNeill's and Harness'. I will probably know in the morning.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

MARTINSBURG, May 29, 1864.

General WEBER:

When will the Twentieth Pennsylvania Cavalry arrive here?

T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Harper's Ferry, May 29, 1864.

Major T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

The Twentieth Pennsylvania Cavalry will start at 1 o'clock to-day.

MAX WEBER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.