War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0544 OPERATIONS IN N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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CUMBERLAND, May 26, 1864.

Major T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

A detachment of the Fifteenth and Twenty-first New York left Green Spring on the 22nd under orders to report to Major-General Sigel in the field. I am not advised that there is a detachment of the Fifteenth New York Cavalry at Beverly. There is at Beverly a detachment of the Twenty-first New York Cavalry, which was ordered on the 14th to report to you in the field. I understand, however, that when the order was received at Beverly most of the detachment was absent on a scout into Pocahontas County. I have telegraphed Colonel Harris to send the detachment of the Twenty-first forward if they have returned, and if not, to do so at once when they do return.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Cumberland, Md., May 26, 1864.

Major T. A. MEYSENBURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Martinsburg:

Lieutenant-Colonel Root, commanding detachments of the Fifteenth and Twenty-first New York Cavalry, was ordered to proceed to Cedar Creek and report to Major-General Sigel, commanding department, from Green Spring Run via Springfield, Bloomery Gap, Pughtown, and Winchester. This being the nearest and most practicable route, I deemed it best he should take it; besides, I desired the country scouted in that direction, as it was reported that small bands of guerrillas were known to be in the neighborhood of Bloomery Gap. I learned to-day that Lieutenant-Colonel Root disobeyed this order; that instead of proceeding by route indicated he crossed the Potomac at Green Spring Run and went down on the Maryland side of the river to Williamsport, or that neighborhood, and then recrossed the river and proceeded by way of Martinsburg, Winchester, &c. I am impressed with the belief, from information received from Green Spring, that Lieutenant-Colonel Root disobeyed this order from sheer cowardice, fearing that he might meet on the route indicated by the order some Confederate force of guerrilla bands. I, therefore, find it my duty to report his conduct to you and ask that it may be represented to the general commanding the department.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May, 26, 1864.

General MAX WEBER:

Captain Waters, the conductor on the express west, encountered obstructions on the tracks this a.m. at 2.30 o'clock at Quincy Station, three-quarters of a mile east of Kearneysville; cross-ties were thrown on the track.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.