War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0517 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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companies of infantry to protect his right flank. I beg that the two brigadier-general asked for last night may be sent me; one for the cavalry division, one for the infantry, and that Lieutenant Stockton be nominated for brigadier-general of volunteers, to command cavalry brigade. The courier bearing this dispatch to Martinsburg will await your answer. Pray telegraph immediately. We move south to-morrow afternoon.

D. HUNTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA, Near Cedar Creek, May 22, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I had the honor to request last night by telegraph, dated from these headquarters, that two efficient and energetic brigadiers might be sent immediately to this department to report to me in the field. I have now to renew this request by letter, the urgency of the need being my apology for troubling you. General Sigel has gone back to Martinsburg, there to assume command of the reserve troops and to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. This leaves me with but General Stahel and Brigadier-General Sullivan, though I am happy to believe there are some excellent colonels in command of the brigades. General Stahel, in command of the cavalry, has had but little experience as a cavalry officer in this country, nor am I aware that he has had any experience with cavalry elsewhere. General Sullivan, in command of the infantry, may be a very excellent officer, but is also of limited experience, and I, therefore, urgently need two additional of experience, energy, and reliability. As I break up camp here to-morrow and move, it is of importance that the brigadiers, if they can be spared, shall be ordered to report immediately to me at my headquarters in the field.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. HUNTER,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WEST VIRGINIA, No. 29.

In the Field, near Cedar Creek, May 22, 1864.

It is of the utmost importance that this army be placed in a situation for immediate efficiency. We are contending against an enemy who is in earnest, and if we expect success, we too must be in earnest. We must be willing to make sacrifices, willing to suffer for a short time, that a glorious result may crown our efforts. The country is expecting every man to do his duty, and this done an ever kind Providence will certainly grant us completed success.

I. Every tent will be immediately turned in for transportation to Martinsburg, and all baggage not expressly allowed by this order will be at once sent to the rear. There will be but one wagon allowed to each regiment an this will only be used to transport spare ammunition, camp kettles, tools, and mess pans. Every wagon will have eight picked horses or mules, two drivers, and two saddles. One wagon and one ambulance will be allowed to department