War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0493 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WASHINGTON, May 19, 1864-11 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Army of the Potomac;

If General Crook falls back to Gauley, I will dispose of his troops as directed. A telegram in the newspapers of this morning, dated Gauley Bridge, the 17th, says that General Crook was at Newbern on the 13th, having gained three victories over the rebels, and destroyed bridge over New River, and several miles of railroad track. Nothing further from Sigel or Sherman. If General Hunter should be given the command in West Virginia, please send me the substance of your instructions for operations in that department. I do not know what your orders to Sigel and Crook have been, but I presume they have looked mainly to the destruction of the rebel railroads and the protection of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

The destruction of the bridge at Harper's Ferry by the flood has delayed the arrival of Western troops.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

WASHINGTON, May 19, 1864-10 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Spotsylvania Court-House, Va.:

General Hunter place in command of the Department of West Virginia. The navy will work up the Rappahannock even to Fredericksburg if you protect the south bank from guerrillas. The land is so high they fire down upon the decks without danger to themselves. More troops will be sent to Fredericksburg to-morrow. I shall continue to send there all I can raise until otherwise ordered.

The Twenty-first Pennsylvania Cavalry arrived to-night fully mounted. Shall I send them forward as cavalry, or arm them as infantry, and give their horses to veterans of the Army of the Potomac? They are raw recruits and of little use as cavalry.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WEST VIRGINIA,

Cedar Creek, May 19, 1864. (Received 11 p. m.)

Captain WAGER:

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Your dispatch dated May 17, 10 p. m., has been received. I reported to the Adjutant-General, from Mount Jackson and Strasburg on the 15th and 16th instant,* that we had me Breckinridge on the 15th at New Market, and fought him the whole day with about 5,500 men, against about 8,000 to 9,000 men. After a loss of 800 killed and wounded, I withdrew my force slowly to Mount Jackson. The enemy sustained heavy losses. I deemed it prudent to withdraw behind Cedar Creek, in which position I am at present, with my advance between Strasburg and Woodstock. The enemy has made no advance; his main force is at Mount Jackson and New Market and his cavalry at Woodstock. I will watch his movements, follow him closely if he withdraws, and resist him if he advances. I have

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* See p. 76.

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