War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0463 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CUMBERLAND, May 15, 1864-4 p. m.

(Received 9.50 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff, Washington:

Eight. Two are at New Creek, two at this place, two at Martinsburg, and two at Harper's Ferry. One on the way I intend to place at Paw Paw. The enemy has gone from the South Richmond Valley to the Valley of the Shenandoah, except McNeill's command, of about 150 men. I am not now threatened on any part of my line, except by small bands of thieving guerrillas; after these my scouting parties are actively engaged.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May 15, 1864-9 a. m.

Governor BOREMAN,

Wheeling:

The people of Gilmer have made a strong appeal to me for help.

I have taken the responsibility to send a force to Glenville. I have also ordered Colonel Harris to send a strong scout into Webster and Braxton. The enemy that has been threatening me via Wardensville and Romney has retreated. We are now quiet and safe along the line of railroad.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May 15, 1864- 1 p. m.

Brigadier General MAX WEBER,

Harper's Ferry:

The One hundred and sixtieth Regiment Ohio Militia are here, and proceed at once to Harper's Ferry to report to you.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, May 15, 1864 -2 p. m.

Brigadier-General WEBER,

Harper's Ferry:

We have had very hard rains for several days; yet raining. The river is getting high. Direct your engineers in charge of pontoon bridge to be on the alert. The river must necessarily be high at the Ferry in a day or two.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Harper's Ferry, May 15, 1864.

Brigadier General B. F. KELLEY:

Colonel Rodgers telegraphs that a train going to the front yesterday was attacked at Strasburg by twenty-five or thirty of Mosby's