War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0461 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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5. The draft for three-years' service to go on in any State or district where the quota is not filled up; but if any officer or soldier in this special service should be drafter, he shall be credited for the service rendered.

Ohio has already sent over 20,000. Ten thousand from your State might do much toward ending this war.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. HASKIN'S DIV., 22nd ARMY CORPS, DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON, Numbers 45.

May 15, 1864.

The One hundred and fiftieth Ohio Volunteer Militia, Colonel W. H. Hayward commanding, having reported to these headquarters for assignment, will occupy the following posts: Two companies at Fort Lincoln, one company at Fort Thayer, one company at Fort Saratoga, one and a half companies at Fort Bunker Hill, one-half company at Fort Slemmer, one company at Fort Totten, two companies at Fort Slocum, and one company at Fort Stevens.

The headquarters will be at Bunker Hill. The lieutenant-colonel will be stationed at Fort Lincoln, and the major at Fort Slocum. The regimental quartermaster will receipt to Captain Nesmith, assistant quartermaster, for the property in this line.

By order of Colonel Haskin:

R. CHANDLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP NEAR NEW MARKET, May 15, 1864.

Major-General STAHEL:

The enemy advances. It seems that Breckinridge has the command, and that he has his whole force together. Some shells have been thrown at our pickets. Colonel Moor has taken a good position, but would be too weak to hold it long. Two batteries could be of great use, and could be sent in advance of our troops. The cavalry pickets posted on the pike from Edenburg to Mount Jackson withdraw an essential portion of the cavalry, and could be used to cover the batteries.

C. HEINTZ,

Captain.

UNION, MONROE COUNTY, W. VA.,

May 15, 1864.

Brigadier General GEORGE CROOK,

Commanding Kanawha Expedition:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I left Charleston on the 1st with the cavalry brigades of General Duffie and Colonel Schoonmaker, and proceeded southward up the tributaries of the Guyandotte and the Big Sandy and along the crests of the mountains toward the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. On my arrival in Tazewell County on the 7th, I found the commands of Generals W. E. Jones and John Morgan, 5,000 strong, near the salt-works, and from prisoners, among whom was Morgan's private secretary,