War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0427 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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including one negro, had arrived at Fort Monroe from City Point in charge of a negro guard. From General Banks' command nothing of recent date has been received.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 11, 1864-11.30 p. m.

Major-General DIX,

New York:

Dispatches from General Grant, dated at 8 o'clock this morning, have just reached this Department. He says: "We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. The result to this time is much in our favor. Our losses have been heavy as well as those of the enemy. I think the loss of the enemy must be greater. We have taken over 5,000 prisoners in battle, whilst he has taken from us but few, except stragglers. I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer." The Government is sparing no pains to support him.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

(Copy to Governors Brough, Morton, Stone, Lewis, Yates, and Bramlette.)

WOODSTOCK, VA., May 11, 1864-10 p. m. (Via Martinsburg. Received 3 p. m. 12th.)

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY:

I arrived here to-day after a slight skirmish with the enemy's cavalry, who retired toward Edenburg. Five hundred cavalry sent out from Winchester to Moorefield were attacked by 1,000 of Imboden's command at Lost River Gap, and driven back to Romney.

FRANZ SIGEL,

Major-General.

GREEN SPRING, May 11, 1864,.

Major-General STAHEL:

On my march from Moorefield to Wardensville my advance encountered the enemy in Lost River Gap. I brought up the column and immediately ordered a charge. I drove him three times, when I was met by an overwhelming force, and I was forced to fall back. I took the Grassy Lick road for Romney. My rear guard fought him and held him in check till within five miles of Romney, when he got on my flank and charged my center with a large force. We repulsed him and held him in check, and the column moved on. I burned the train and saved the horses. He followed to Springfield. I have brough nearly all my command safely to this point. My loss is not heavy. The enemy's force is supposed to the Rosser's Imboden's, McNeill's, and Harness' commands. His main force encamped near Romney last night. His force has been reported at from 2,000 to 3,000. I have not seen more than seven squadrons of cavalry at a time. It was reported that he had some artillery, but it