War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0422 OPERATIONS IN N.VA., W.VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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CUMBERLAND, May 10, 1864.

Governor BOREMAN,

Wheeling:

I fully concur with you in the opinion that the mountain passes is the proper place to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the people of West Virginia, but my orders confine me to the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. It would be proper for the Governor of West Virginia to request the Secretary of War to extend my jurisdiction to the these points with his view. It would not be proper for me to make the application myself. I will, however, do all in my power to give protection and safety to the people. I do not now think it probable that Jackson and Imboden will attempt their contemplated raid.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

BALTIMORE, May 10, 1864. (Received 9.35 p. m.)

General B. F. KELLEY:

Thanks for your advices to Boehm. No trains will be on road between Sir John's Run and Cumberland to-night, or till you advise us to resume them. Are your block-houses manned now? Have you got any of the new Ohio regiments yet?

W. P. SMITH.

[MAY 10, 1864.-For Weber to Kelley, relating to affair at Halltown and other matters, see p. 69.]

CUMBERLAND, May 10, 1864.

Brigadier General MAX WEBER,

Harper's Ferry:

Your telegram duly received. I hope to be able in a few days to give you all the force you may require. Please keep your cavalry active and on the alert. All quiet in this region.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

MARTINSBURG, May 10, 1864.

Captain BURLEIGH,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The horses have just been taken from two sutler's wagons scarcely two miles from out of town by guerrillas. I have sent notice to Kearneysville and am sending a party of cavalry out in pursuit. Two persons of suspicious character have been seen near here examining the position of things with a glass.

R. S. RODGERS,

Colonel.