War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0378 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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enemy do not intend to attack you, and if you hear any news of the enemy, the general directs that you send a courier to these headquarters at once with the information.

I am, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. MELVIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 4, 1864-3.40 p. m.

Brigadier General MAX WEBER, Harper's Ferry:

No person will be permitted to go south through our lines without the permission of the Secretary of War.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

POINT OF ROCKS, May 4, 1864.

Brigadier General MAX WEBER, Harper's Ferry:

Information has reached this office through Lieutenant Atwell, Virginia Rangers, that there are 200 rebels in Leesburg, conscripting.

R. C. BAMFORD,

Captain and Provost-Marshal.

HEADQUARTERS POST,

Martinsburg, W. Va., May 4, 1864.

Captain BIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the major-general's dispatch of the 2nd instant in relation to trains and escorts, and request that the officer in charge of escorts coming in may be especially ordered to report to me, which they frequently neglect to do, and which causes me much embarrassment as I cannot know what I have suitable for escort. I shall continue to reserve small detachments as I have already done for the purpose of escorting trains. I have had no addition to my force here, which consists only of a provost guard of 100 men. The battery of artillery has been brought into the town so as to command the streets and protect the stores and railroad depot. But I beg to remark that as twelve men attacked one train and carried off the horses a few days ago, it is possible for a more serious force to come and go in the same direction. I have represented my situation to Brigadier-General Weber, but as yet he has been unable to send my own regiment, with which I should feel very secure against any force which the enemy would be likely to spare. At present it is not impossible for men to come into the post in small parties and in disguise, as I have not sufficient force to place proper guards around the place and perform the necessary duties of the provost guard. I think it proper to make this explanation of my position to the major-general commanding, but at the same time to assure him I shall take every precaution in my power to prevent a surprise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. S. RODGERS,

Colonel, Commanding.