War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0267 Chapter XLIX. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY, ETC.

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TWO MILES FROM POOLESVILLE, MD.,

July 14, 1864--2.30 p. m. (Received 9.20 p. m.)

My cavalry is in the immediate vicinity of Poolesville, and finds the enemy in some force. He has opened upon the cavalry with two guns. What the force is, is not yet developed, but will be determined as soon as the infantry column (the head of which is about half an hour in rear) comes up.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

Poolesville, Md., July 14, 1864--6 p. m.

I have the honor to report my arrival at this point, and that most of the infantry of this corps and a part of the artillery have come up. The train is stretched along the road for a great distance, and will not be all up by midnight, if so soon. Judging from last reports the troops of the Nineteenth Corps will not reach this place by ten miles to-night.

The cavalry overtook the rear guard of the enemy's cavalry at this point, which fell back after a slight skirmish, taking the road to White's Ford, where the main body of the enemy, with his trains, had crossed before we reached this place. I have sent the cavalry forward to see whether anything can be done against the rear guard, but presume it will be to late. The enemy had and kept about twenty-four hours the start of us, which gave him full time to secure his crossing of the river.

I have not been able to get any intelligence from General Hunter's command, and have, therefore, for further operations only the two divisions of my corps, numbering perhaps 10,000, and some 500 possibly of the Nineteenth Corps, which, unless I overrate the enemy's strength, is wholly insufficient to justify the following up of the enemy o the other side of the Potomac. I presume this will not be the policy of the War Department, and I shall, therefore, wait instructions before proceeding farther, which I hope to receive by the time the Nineteenth Corps arrives. In the mean time I shall endeavor to open communication both with General Hunter and general Howe. I should also report that a portion of the enemy's cavalry, said to be McCausland's, is represented to have crossed at Muddy Branch Ford, and some at Edwards Ferry, though not in considerable numbers. I changed the direction of the column to this point on learning that the ford at Edwards Ferry was not passable for trains, and hoped to be able to come up with the enemy at once of the upper fords.

My troops have marched over thirty miles in about twenty-four hours, over bad roads and under excessive heat.

I send this by an officer, who is directed to await your instructions.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.