War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0239 Chapter XLIX. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY, ETC.

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The guns were manned by troops of Battery A, First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, Captain Spear commanding, and Battery L, Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, Lieutenant Howe commanding.

Number of--

Case-shot from 100-pounder Parrott....................... 18

Shells from 100-pounder Parrott.......................... 10

Solid shot from 100-pounder Parrott...................... 4

Percussion-shells from 30-pounder Parrott................ 49

Fuse shell from 30-pounder Parrott....................... 17

Case-shot from 30-pounder Parrott........................ 3

Spherical case from 32-pounder sea-coast gun............. 8

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Total number of rounds...................................109

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN NORRISS,

Captain Provisional Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery.

Brigadier General M. D. HARDIN, Commanding Division.

Numbers 28. Report of Colonel James M. Warner, First Vermont Heavy Artillery, commanding First Brigade, of the defense of Washington.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIGADE, HARDIN'S DIVISION,

Tennallytown, July 18, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the military operations in this brigade from the 9th to the 13th instant, inclusive:

On the afternoon of the 9th instant, Captain Wing having reported with abut sixty of the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, was at once sent on the Rockville road to observe and report the movements of the enemy, with instructions to go as far as Rockville and beyond on the Frederick or River road as circumstances should develop.

Captain Wing subsequently joined Major Fry, who passed through Tennallytown about 10 p. m. the same evening with 500 cavalrymen. Major Fry encountered the enemy's advance guard about four miles beyond Rockville on the Frederick road. Soon they appeared in force and Major Fry was compelled to fall back, and at 4 p. m. had fallen back to our infantry pickets, about two miles out from Tennallytown. I immediately caused the infantry pickets to be strengthened from the River to the Brookeville pike, and Major Fry was directed to make a stand in his present position. It was decided to concentrate troops to man the guns and rifle-pits from Fort Kearny on the right to Fort Simmons on the left. This I was enabled to do by the opportune arrival of the Seventh Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, Lieutenant Colonel H. G. Thomas, the First Brigade, Veteran Reserve Corps, under Colonel G. W. Gile, Major Snyder's battalion of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, and by the withdrawal of Battery I, Second U. S. Artillery, and a company of the One hundred and fifty-first regiment Ohio National Guard, from the river batteries to the front line. The troops this night bivouacked at the guns and along the rifle-pits.

On the following morning, the 11th, at daybreak Colonel Lowell, Second Massachusetts Cavalry, with about three squadrons of his own regiment and one squadron of the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, relieved Major Fry's command, who were nearly out of ammunition. Skirmishing was kept up with the enemy during the entire day, and