War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0233 Chapter XLIX. OPERATIONS IN SHENANDOAH VALLEY, ETC.

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equal to, if not greater than, ours, our loss being about 250 killed and wounded. The Sixth Corps marching next day, I am unable to give the loss accurately.

A special report should be made by General H. G. Wright, commanding the corps, and it is left to him to do justice to the gallant officers and men of his command who behaved so well in this spirited affair-small, yet a very important one, as it was one of the causes that induced the enemy to abandon their idea of attacking Washington.

I am satisfied the rebel force which confronted Washington was not less than 30,000. Ewell's old corps (entire), consisting of three divisions, commanded respectively by Generals Rodes, Gordon, and Ransom, was encamped upon F. P. Blair, Sr.'s, farm. Breckinridge's command, consisting of about 10,000 infantry, was farther back and in the vicinity of Leesborough. My estimate of their forces was made from the most reliable sources possible, and all evidences show their force to have been divided as follows:

Ewell's old corps (infantry)...................... 12,000

Breckinridge's corps (infantry)................... 10,000

Artillery......................................... 1,000

Cavalry........................................... 7,000

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Total............................................. 30,000

Having instructions to hold the Sixth Corps in reserve, a further explanation may be necessary for the attack ordered on the evening of the 12th:

First. The points assailed were commanding ones when in possession of the enemy-enfiladed and commanded a portion of the picket-line necessary to be maintained in front of the works.

Second. These points in our possession gave us observation over a ravine to the left and a depression of ground on the right of the Silver Spring road, not in view from the forts, and in which the enemy could mass a large force.

Third. It was believed that the veterans of this corps could do the work better, and with less loss of life, than the other troops under my command.

There are other and minor reasons, but these are deemed sufficient.

My thanks are due to Major General H. G. Wright, U. S. Volunteers, for his earnest co-operation in every duty.

To Brigadier General M. C. Meigs, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, commanding the line from Fort Totten to De Russy, my thanks are due for his willing and untiring discharge of duty.

Brigadier General D. H. Rucker, U. S. Volunteers, commanding quartermaster employees; Brigadier General H. E. Paine, commanding line on right of Fort Stevens, and Brigadier General M. D. Hardin, U. S. Volunteers, commanding the line from Fort De Russy to Sumner, have my thanks for their valuable assistance in properly maintaining the portions of the line intrusted to their care.

Captain Charles Dupont, Thirteenth Michigan Battery, deserves greater credit for the skill displayed in directing the artillery of Fort Stevens.

Lieutenant-Colonel Frazee, One hundred and fiftieth Ohio (100-days' men), displayed efficiency and zeal during the 11th and 12th instant.