War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0160 OPERATIONS IN N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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on that road to-day, except the party that burnt forest Depot. He will make a reconnaissance up that road with his brigade as far as, or beyond, the depot. I am moving a brigade up this road toward New London to see what the enemy is about. he attempted to drive in my pickets this morning at 9 a. m., but the party was repulsed and driven back, and pursued some distance. I have heard nothing from the detachment I sent early this morning toward Campbell Court-House to watch enemy's movements in direction of Danville railroad.

Very respectfully,

J. D. IMBODEN,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General BRECKINRIDGE.

Numbers 27. Reports of Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, C. S. Army, of engagement at Lynchburg, and pursuit of the Union forces.

NEW LONDON, June 19, 1864-9.30 a. m.

GENERAL: Last evening the enemy assaulted my lines in front of Lynchburg and was repulsed by the part of my command which was up. On the arrival of the rest of the command I made arrangements to attack this morning at light, but it was discovered that the enemy were retreating, and I am now pursuing. The enemy is retreating in confusion, and if the cavalry does its duty we will destroy him.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

General R. E. LEE

(Care of General Bragg).

ROANOKE, June 22, 1864.

The enemy passed through Salem on yesterday and took the route toward Lewisburg by New Castle. McCausland with his cavalry struck the enemy north of Salem, at the Hanging Rock, and captured 4 pieces of artillery and disabled 6 others so that had to be left, and the carriages were destroyed by the enemy. The guns, however, are secured, making 10 in all. The enemy moved so rapidly that I could not attacked him before he got into the mountains, though I marched over twenty miles a day. I have rested to-day, and to-morrow will move in accordance with original instructions, watching, however, the movements of Hunter. The enemy did a great deal of damage to citizens in Bedford and Campbell, but not so much in Roanoke, as they were too closely pursued. All bridges and depots on the railroad were burnt at Salem, but little other damage was done to the road.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

General R. E. LEE

(Care of General Bragg).