War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0148 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

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Crook brought up two brigades, which were soon deployed and advanced to the support of my line, and two of his batteries also arrived at the front. The enemy, driven to his field-works, received re-enforcements, and confidently advanced to charge my line. Had the infantry support been in position, to have carried on our success, then we might have achieved some important advantages. As it was my line had a hard struggle to maintain its position until the infantry arrived, but with it came the dusk of evening, and although the boldness of the enemy was severely punished, our attack was delayed until the morning.

During the night, by the direction of the major-general commanding, efforts were made to communicate with Duffie, who had lost himself on the extreme left. Scouting parties were also sent to obtain information from the city. Re-enforcements continually arrived to the enemy. On the following morning Duffie was found and ordered to attack on the Forest road. Two hundred men under Captain Duncan, Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, were sent to the enemy's extreme left to harass him, and, if possible, destroy the railroad. Later Powell's brigade was sent to attack the enemy at the Campbell Court-House road.

The enemy busied himself with throwing up earth-works during the night of the 17th and the day of the 18th, until 4 p.m., when he advanced from his works, making an attack, which was quickly repulsed. Schoonmaker's brigade was placed in position during the action, but was not called upon to enter it. Oley way looking out for the rear and left. It was evident that too many lives must be expended to carry the enemy's position. The morrow would find him in a condition to assume the offensive, if not already so. The delay at Lexington, rendered necessary by the deviation of the First Cavalry Division from the course ordered for it, and the change of place made by ordering it to join the main body, instead of going around Lynchburg, had proved fatal to the successful execution of the original project.

The orders of the major-general commanding to withdraw westward along the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad left me as rear guard of the column, which position was maintained until our arrival at Liberty. Between the Big and Little Otter Rivers I received orders from the major-general commanding to make a movement upon the Danville railroad, which were suspended soon after at Liberty. Upon the arrival of the army at the latter place if halted to rest west of the town. I had requested that a brigade of infantry be left to support me, anticipating an attack from the indications in rear; but my request was not granted, and unaided my division stood the brunt of a severe attack for two h ours. Schoonmaker's Crook's, which had been formed in line of battle a mile in the rear. My loss in this severe engagement was 122.

At 3 a.m. the 20th the march was resumed in the direction of Buford's Gap. Scouts had informed us that a heavy force of cavalry had passed the night before to the northward in the direction of the Peaks of Otter. Arrived west of the gap, my division was placed in position in connection with Crook's to enable the troops to rest and refresh themselves. At sundown the column was again in motion toward Salem, Duffie's division in advance of the trains, and my own in rear, with the exception of Powell's brigade, which was left with