War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0113 Chapter XLIX. THE LYNCHBURG CAMPAIGN.

Search Civil War Official Records

On the 26th General Hunter with his staff, having passed Meadow Bluff and the enemy having ceased pursuit, rode on in advance with the escort (a squadron of cavalry) and the reserve signal detachment, halting at night at Widow Jones' house.

On the 27th headquarters reached Loup Creek by way of Gauley Bridge, where we encamped to await the arrival of troops. The men and horses had suffered greatly from want of supplies, which had been ordered to be sent from Gauley to them, and a great deal of disorganization was the result. There I encamped what men and officers I had and remained till the 30th, when we marched to Camp Piatt on the Kanawha, and thence took a steamer to Charleston. By General Hunter's order I directed the signal detachment to remain at Camp Piatt till morning and then march to Charleston, at which place the party arrived July 1.

On the 3rd of July, after starting the detachment under charge of Lieutenant Merritt to march to Parkersburg, I accompanied General Hunter and staff by steamer to Parkersburg, where we arrived July 4, where General Hunter learned of the enemy's invasion of Maryland and made disposition to hasten forward troops.

On the 5th I opened communication with Blennerhassett Landing, having neither officers nor equipments, and but one man who was able to read fairly, but he and I kept open communication with apparatus improvised, until the detachment arrived on the 6th.

On the 5th I opened communication with Blennerhassett Landing, having neither officers nor equipments, and but one man who was able to read fairly, but he and I kept open communication with apparatus improvised, until the detachment arrived on the 6th.

On the 7th General Hunter directed me to open a line to Buffington Bar. I took Lieutenants Ellis and Jones and Merritt and Sergeants Price and Burkhardt and opened the line, stationing them in the following order, viz, Fortney, Price, Burkhardt, Merritt, Ellis.

On the 9th I returned to Parkersburg and found that General Hunter had gone to Cumberland and sent telegraphic orders to me to call in all officers and men and follow. Accordingly I sent a steamer down toward Buffington for the parties and on the 10th forwarded what men and horses were at Parkersburg, and on the 11th followed with the balance, overtaking the first train at Cumberland at 10.20 p.m., where I reported to General Hunter and he directed me to proceed with my party to Martinsburg and report to General Sullivan. I started at 12 o'clock midnight, the first train having been sent on earlier, and on the morning of the 12th arrived at Cherry Run, and thence marched to Martinsburg and reported to General Sullivan. Private Mateer, who had been captured and paroled, informed me that Sergeant Brown and 1 or 2 other men had been captured.

General Sullivan started at 3 p.m. on the 13th for Harper's Ferry. At 1 o'clock I had sent Lieutenants Merritt and Brault to Maryland. Heights, but they were bushwhackers and driven back, but meeting the escort of Generals Sigel and Stahel they drove the enemy and got through and opened communication.

At 3 a.m. on the 14th I marched with my party to Harper's Ferry, arriving there at 9.30 a.m. There I found Lieutenant Thayer and Kennedy, from Department of the Susquehanna, for temporary duty. I sent Lieutenant Merritt to Stone Fort, on Maryland Heights, Lieutenants Jones to Bolivar Heights, Lieutenant Butcher to Point of Rocks, Lieutenants Ellis and Brault to Sugar Loaf Mountain. Lieutenant Kennedy, who had been on Sugar Loaf Mountain, came in and reported a rebel wagon train heavily guarded crossing to Virginia at White's Ferry.

8 R-VOL XXXVII, PT I