War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0053 Chapter XLIX. VIRGINIA AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.

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upon them a terrific volley of musketry, and they wee forced to fall back, pursued by the enemy to their position behind the barricade. As they fell back, passing my right of center, the enemy pressed forward and drove back the two companies on my right of center, as well as the two companies sent me by the Sixtieth. When my left center company (K) had been withdrawn from my left, Major Davis closed the line on the left of my center by moving the companies toward it, at the same time throwing forward two companies from his extreme left to a point about 100 yards in front of my line of battle and perpendicular thereto, to meet and resist a large force of the enemy advancing through a meadow in front of the left, thereby successfully checking their advance and creating confusion in their ranks. The enemy continuing to press heavily upon the center and right, the two companies thrown forward by Major Davis were withdrawn to the original line of battle.

My center was the highest point of the ridge, running parallel with the mountain, and descending to the right and left of the center. The right being repulsed, the enemy occupied this high point and gave an enfilading fire to the left, which being also hotly assailed in front was driven back. My regiment fell back about 200 yards and rallied on the left of the Thirty-sixth Virginia Regiment, which had been brought from the extreme left to that point, the Sixtieth immediately rallying on my left. We maintained our position here under a very heavy fire for about fifteen minutes, when the enemy appeared in force on a hill on the left of the Thirty-sixth Virginia Regiment, which had been brought from the extreme left to that point, the Sixtieth immediately rallying on my left. We maintained our position here under a very heavy fire for about fifteen minutes, when the enemy appeared in force on a hill on the left of the road, within 150 yards of the left of the Sixtieth Regiment. The whole line then moved back in tolerable order, and arriving at the skirt of wood in rear of this last position made another stand for a short time and then continued to retreat. Some confusion ensued in consequence of the commands becoming intermingled.

My loss in this battle was 26 killed, 96 wounded, 46 captured, and 6 missing; total, 174.

Among the killed and mortally wounded we have to mourn the death of Lieutenant Colonel E. H. Harman, Captain Robert R. Crockett, Company F; Lieutenant John R. Brown, Company B; Lieuts. C. N. Porter and H. H. Lockett, Company D. More gallant and fearless officers than they it is difficult to imagine. Being among the first to volunteer their services in the Confederate Army, they have ever proved themselves skillful and bold in action, prompt, faithful, and efficient in the discharge of their every duty. The loss in commissioned officers was especially heavy. Besides those mentioned as dead, seven others were more or less severely wounded.

Of the non-commissioned officers and privates who were killed there were many valuable soldiers whose places it would be difficult to supply.

I am under obligations to Major Davis for his valuable services in directing the movements of the left wing of the regiment, and it gives me pleasure to bear testimony to the gallantry exhibited by him throughout the engagement. The conduct of the officers generally was praiseworthy and commendable, and they rendered me much assistance during the battle and retreat.

Respectfully submitted,

WM. H. BROWNE,

Colonel, Commanding Forty-fifth Virginia Regiment.

Major CHARLES S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.