War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0049 Chapter XLIX. VIRGINIA AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.

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[Inclosure.]

List of Casualties in the battle of Cloyd's Farm, May 9, 1864, and subsequent operations.

Killed. Wounded. Captured.

Command. Office Men. Office Men Office Men.

rs. rs. rs.

36th Virginia ... 18 3 55 ... 30

Infantry

30th Virginia 4 16 9 59 1 ...

Infantry

45th ... 4 2 9 ... ...

Battalion

Virginia

Infantry

45th Virginia 5 21 7 89 ... 46

Infantry

Bryan's ... 3 1 3 ... ...

battery

Ringgold ... ... ... 4 ... ....

Battery

Botetourt ... ... ... 1 ... ...

Artillery

17th Virginia ... ... ... 2 ... ...

Cavalry

Morgan's 1 4 ... 18 ... ...

dismounted

men, under

Colonel D.

H. Smith.

Total 10 66 22 240 1 76

Missing. Loss.

Command. Officer Men. Total. Aggregat

s. e.

36th Virginia ... 5 108 111

Infantry

30th Virginia ... 64 139 153

Infantry

45th ... 15 28 30

Battalion

Virginia

Infantry

45th Virginia ... 6 162 174

Infantry

Bryan's ... ... 6 7

battery

Ringgold 1 2 6 7

Battery

Botetourt ... ... 1 1

Artillery

17th Virginia ... ... ... ...

Cavalry

Morgan's ... 30 52 53

dismounted

men, under

Colonel D.

H. Smith.

Total 1 122 504 538

JAS. FRANCIS,

Lieutenant, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, 4th Brigadier, Army of W. Va.

Numbers 21. Report of Major William E. Fife, Thirty-sixth Virginia Infantry of operations May 8-14.

HDQRS. THIRTY SIXTH Regiment VIRGINIA INFTY.,

Near Christiansburg, Va., May 20, 1864.

MAJOR: In accordance with instructions received from headquarters Department of Western Virginia, May 19, 1864, I herewith submit the following report of the part taken by this regiment in the action of the 9th instant at Cloyd's farm, and its subsequent movements up to this time:

On Sunday, the 8th instant, the regiment moved from the vicinity of Dublin Depot to Cloyd's farm to meet the enemy, who was reported advancing. We reached that placed about 10 a. m. and were put in position on the extreme left and supporting Bryan's battery, which was posted on an eminence in our immediate front. We lay quiet all day. In the evening there were two lieutenants (Ferrell and Shannon) and forty men sent out to skirmish with the enemy as he advanced up the mountain. I am happy to say they did their duty well.

On Monday, the 9th, about 9 a. m., the pickets and skirmishers commenced firing, which continued for about half an hour, when the enemy made his appearance on the mountain. About 10.30 o'clock, the enemy having made his dispositions, he advanced to the attack; our troops met him with coolness and determination. Our to their support. The regiment moved promptly and with dispatch, being double-quicked the whole distance, which was considerable. When the regiment came up to the point where our services were needed, the men were much scattered by moving so rapidly. The regiment was formed in two lines (the left wing in rear of the right) for the purpose of charging the enemy. The order