War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0027 Chapter XLIX. VIRGINIA AND TENNESSEE RAILROAD.

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ginia Regiment, to follow the enemy over the mountain and to hold the road at the north base, which was duly executed by that talented and efficient officer. The brigade encamped at the foot of Peter's Mountain, on Salt Sulphur Springs road, at 5.30 p. m.

May 14, morning very stormy; march resumed at 12 m. toward Union, bivouacking for the night on Indian Creek. Nothing worthy of note transpired.

May 15, resumed march at 5 a. m. on road leading to Union. Nothing of special note transpired during the march. The brigade encamped at 11 a. m., one miles southeast of Union, Monroe County.

May 16, resumed march at 8 a. m. on road toward Alderon's Ferry, Greenbrier River, crossed Swope's Knob and encamped at 4 p. m on the south bank of Greenbrier River, near Alderson's Ferry.

Owing to the high state of the river and limited means of ferrying the third Brigade did not reach the north bank of the river until 2 p. m., May 18, when it resumed its march at 3 p. m. toward Meadow Bluff, bivouacking for the night on Muddy Creek, near Palestine, Greenbrier County. Nothing of interest transpired.

May 19, resumed march at 6 a. m. on the Blue Sulphur Springs road, the Third Brigade, train and rear guard. Nothing of interest transpired except the loss of a gun carriage of one of the captured pieces, which occurred from carelessness on the part of the driver allowing it to run on the side of a precipice. The brigade encamped at Meadow Bluff at 1 p. m., men and animals much exhausted for want of proper food, and from the excessively muddy condition of the roads, having made a march of 247 miles in twenty days.

I am happy to be able to congratulate the commanding general and the country at large upon the unbounded success of the expedition. In no respect, to my knowledge, has he failed to accomplish all the object for which the expedition was designed and fitted out. We have whipped the enemy at all points, capturing and destroying immense amounts of commissary, quartermaster, and ordnance stores, together with depots, store-houses, and barracks, about seventeen miles of railroad, several bridges, trestle-works, &c., among the most important of which is the New River railroad bridge, near Central Depot, Montgomery County, Va.

The following will exhibit the amount and kind of property captured and taken up by the officers of my staff and properly accounted for by Lieutenant Edward F. Brother, acting assistant quartermaster:

Horses........................................................ 30

Mules......................................................... 4

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Total......................................................... 34

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Corn...............................................bushels....120

Rye.................................................do........ 10

Oats................................................do........ 5

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Total...............................................do........135

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Hay...............................................tons........ 10

Tobacco...........................................pounds......700

Taken up by Lieutenant Boyer, acting commissary of subsistence:

Young beef-cattle...................................head...... 45

Oxen.................................................do....... 2

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Total...............................................do........ 47