War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0016 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter XLIX.

Search Civil War Official Records

Numbers 5. Report of Colonel Hiram F. Devol, Thirty-sixth Ohio Infantry, of engagement at Cloyd's Mountain.

HDQRS. THIRTY-SIXTH Regiment OHIO VOL. INFTY.,

Meadow Bluff, May 30, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report the part taken by my regiment and a detachment of the Thirty-fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (attached to the Thirty-sixth Under my command) at the late battle of Cloyd's Mountain, May 9, 1864, all amounting to about 500 men.

I was first ordered to support the Twenty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but, owing to conflicting orders, did not get started until the former regiment had. I ten deemed it best (not knowing the exact position of the Twenty-third) to engage the enemy in the vacant space between the Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, on the left, and the Twenty-third Regiment. In receiving the fire of the enemy my men moved steadily forward, returning their fire and driving them, which soon became a perfect rout - a few of my command pursuing. Quite a number of prisoners were taken.

Both officers and men behaved well. I cannot particularize without mentioning the whole.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. F. DEVOL,

Commanding Regiment.

Captain HASTINGS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

The only order given by me to Colonel Devol, sent by Lieutenant Wood, acting aide-de-camp, was to advance, supporting the Twenty-third. If any order conflicting with this was received it was not with my knowledge.

R. B. HAYES,

Colonel, Commanding.

Numbers 6. Report of Colonel Carr B. White, Twelfth Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of engagement at Cloyd's Mountain.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, SECOND DIV., DEPT. OF W. VA.

Meadow Bluff, May 21, 1864.

I have the honor herewith to report the part taken by the Second Brigade in the action at Cloyd's Mountain on the 9th instant.

Guided by a negro of the neighborhood, the brigade made a detour to the left from the north entrance of the gap, and crossed the mountain one-half mile below, moved around, and attacked the enemy on his extreme right. The attack was vigorous and obstinately maintained until the enemy was driven from behind his cover of rail stockades and rifle-pits and completely routed. The well-times attack of Colonel R. B. Hayes, commanding First Brigade, on our right, aided materially in dislodging the enemy from his well-chosen