War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0897 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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roads. The Sixty-fourth Georgia will be stationed from Battery Numbers 16 to Numbers 27, inclusive, and Archer's militia from Numbers 27 extending to the right as far as they will reach.

By command of Brigadier-General Wise:

JAMES H. PEARCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. ARMIES OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES,

Richmond, June 12, 1864.

His Excellency JEFF. DAVIS,

President:

Mr. PRESIDENT: The dispatches from Western Virginia induce me to invite your attention again to the inadequacy of our forces in that section. By the lowest estimate the enemy now has some 14,000 men. It seems well settled that Pope is to join with 4,000 more. To oppose this we have under Breckinridge, including all fragments and all arms, about 9,000 - not more than 5,000 of them can be considered reliable. The crude and disorganized mounted detachments, demoralized by licensed marauding in East Tennessee and Southwest Virginia, have already justified the estimate formed of them. It seems to me a pressing necessity to send at least 6,000 good troops to re-enforce Breckinridge.

I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG.

[Indorsement.]

JUNE 13, 1864.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

I am inclined to think the force of the enemy exaggerated and our own troops unduly depreciated, but I concur in thinking re-enforcements, if they can be possibly spared, very desirable.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

June 12, 1864.

General SAMUEL COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: During the late movements of the army, the condition of General Ewell's health rendered it proper that he should be relieved temporarily from the command of his corps. Although now restored to his usual health, I think the labor and exposure to which he would be inevitably exposed would at this time again incapacitate him for field service. The general, who has all the feelings of a good soldier, differs from me in this opinion, and is not only willing but anxious to resume his command. I, however, think in the present emergency it would jeopardize his life; and should his strength fail, it would prove disadvantageous to the service. I, therefore, propose that he be placed on some duty attended with less labor and exposure. It has occurred to me that the command of the Defenses of Richmond would be more in accordance with his state of health, and give him a position where he could perform valuable service. I cordially recommend that he be placed on this duty unless circumstances exist

57 R R - VOL XXXVI, PT III