War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0787 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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terday at the White House will relieve Wilson of any apprehension of being disturbed, and I trust Sheridan will keep Hampton occupied. I don t think Sheridan will have much chance of getting to Deep Botton bridge in the face of Hampton unless he is able to give him a severe and serious defeat. Wilson will be instructed when at the junction to endeavor to communicate with Hunter near Lynchburg. The junction is about half way between this point and Lynchburg. If Sheridan were here there would be no doubt, I think, of he and Wilson going to Lynchburg. Do you wish to send any instructions to Hunter by Wilson?

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 21, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

I found on my arrival here yesterday two division of the enemy's cavalry in front of this place. This morning I crossed the brigade. The enemy fell back behind Black Creek at point near Tunstall's Station. This place is all right. They enemy shell the trains yesterday before I arrived. They were yesterday evening all crossed over to the north side of the Pamunkey.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE POTOMAC,

June 20, 1864-8 a. m. (Received 8.25 a. m.)

Brigadier General GEORGE W. GETTY,

Commanding at White House, Va.:

The following order* was sent to you yesterday by Major Forsyth, Right Illinois Cavalry. If this telegram reaches you in season the commanding general directs instead of moving your infantry by water portion of your infantry ordered to City Point. Please acknowledge.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WHITE HOUSE, June 21, 1864.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

Shall I await here for Ord? General Sheridan thinks he was marching for Lynchburg.

GEORGE W. GETTY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.