War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0781 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, RTC.-UNION.

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rived last night with dispatches from General Sheridan, the duplicate of those sent by telegraph from Yorktown. Major Forsyth has been directed to await the orders of the lieutenant-general commanding. Orders have been sent to General Sheridan to await further instructions at the White House. Your attention was called last evening to the reported position of General Hunter, 10 miles southwest of Lynchburg. This renders the probability of his reaching the White House very remote and it becomes a question of how long that post should be retained after Sheridan leaves it. It will be maintained so far as my orders until otherwise instructed. I propose to-night to hold my present lines with the Sixth, Ninth, and Fifth Corps and keep the Second in reserve. I have reason to believe, from prisoners and contrabands, taht Beauregard has been re-enforced by two division of Hill's corps, Wilcox's and Anderson's and possibly others. The enemy's line is continued as far beyond my left flank as I have been able to reconnoiter, and they are, busily occupied strengthening it. I do not propose making any movement to-day. If you will be at home this morning I will ride down to see you.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 20, 1864-10 a. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Wilson was directed to report the moment he was ready for service. To-day is his third day of rest. Your dispatch has been sent to him to show him the importance of his being ready. Where do you suppose the enemy's cavalry to be? And do you not think that with the knowledge of Sheridan's withdrawal, Hampton will be drawn into Richmond ready to be thrown on any reading party? It has occurred to me that with Hunter's position as known, Sheridan would be moire likely to communicate with him and assist him by going from here up the south bank of the James, than from the White House. In that case Wilson could join him and make his force such that could not be stopped. If a bridge is thrown over at Deep Bottom Sheridan could cross there. I make these suggestions for what they are would. I proposed riding down to the Point to see you if you remained at home to-day, but have had no reply to my inquiry.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

CITY POINT, VA., June 20, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding, &c.:

In view of the location of General Hunter, as reported in the rebel papers, and the fact that General Sheridan cannot carry supplies with him from the White House to make an effective raid against the enemy's communications north of the James, you may direct his immediate return to the Army of the Potomac. The manner of returning and roue is left to you. Direct the commanding officer