War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0769 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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G. W. Getty to the command of that place I am instructed by the major-general commanding to say that you will continue duty at the While House until you are relived by Brigadier-General Getty.

It is not known here whether General Getty reached the White House.

I am, very respectfully, you obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WHITE HOUSE, June 12, 1864.

(Received 2.15 p. m.)

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

Transportation by water for 16,000 troops will be required from this place to-morrow. The movement is very important, and it is necessary that all vessels suitable for transporting troops, which have been sent from this place to Washington and Alexandria, be returned at once, together with other vessels as can be spared. General Ingalls authorized me to telegraph you.

P. P. PITKIN,

Captain, Assistant Quartermasters.

COLD HARBOR, VA., June 12, 1864.

Colonel BIGGS,

Chief Quartermasters, Eighteenth Corps:

Lieutenant-Colonel Dent, of my staff, has gone to Fort Monroe and Bermuda Hundred to make, or rather communicate, the necessary orders for securing the crossing of the army over James River at Fort Powhatan. Special instructions were not given, however, to send ferry-boats, pontoons, &c., that may yet beat Fort Monroe. This will be understood, no doubt, by General Butler from the instructions that have gone to him; but to expedite, I now direct that you forward up the James River all things within your charge, and request the engineer officer at Fort Monroe, for me, to sandal the pontoon bridge material he may have on hand. Send also all the lumber you, practicably the 2-inch plank. This will not be constructed to infantry with sending the amount of transportation to the White House heretofore called for.

U. G. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

Cold Harbor, June 12, 1864.

Major-General BUTLER:

Go on with the corduroy suggested by Comstock. A staff is on way with letter of instructions to you, but did not leave here until last night. Your chief engineer will understand the corduroy meant.

GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

49 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT III