War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0689 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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suspended by a tri-colored ribbon. Brigade commanders and staff will wear the same cross, without the triangle, suspended by the tri-colored ribbon, and the number of their brigade in the center in white enamel.

Line officers will wear their brigade cross suspended by a blue ribbon. The cavalry officers will wear a yellow cross, with two crossed sabers in white relief enamel, suspended by a yellow ribbon. Enlisted men the same badge without the ribbon. The artillery officers will wear a blue cross, with a white triangle and two crossed cannon of red enamel, suspended by a red ribbon; enlisted men the same without the ribbon. The crosses will be made with a pin on the back, and the wearer's name and rank, and of such metal as my be chosen. The ribbon is distinctive of a commissioned officer, and the tri-colored ribbon of a staff officer, and no others will be permitted to wear these badges. The crosses will be worn on the left breast. Enlisted men will be furnished as soon as practicable with badges of cloth to be sewed to their left breast.

By command of Major General William F. Smith:

N. BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, June 7, 1864.

Brigadier-General AMES,

Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires that you keep yourself posted regarding the state of affairs on General Burnside's left, that you be able to make proper dispositions for your own safety, or in case of necessity to give any assistance that may be possible to give. Please send Captain Musser, commissary of subsistence of one of your brigades, to report here for temporary duty. You will have to detail some one to take his place for a few days.

Respectfully, &c.,

N. BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, June 7, 1864.

ASSISTANT INSPECTOR-GENERAL, CAVALRY BUREAU:

CAPTAIN: I fully indorse your proposed order in reference to cavalry inspectors. Our difficulty heretofore has been in making our wants known to the bureau. We had no direct channel to communicate through, but now will. Some confusion has occurred in mounting veterans on the horses sent out. This has arisen from the frequent change of depot, and from the fact that the dismounted men were guarding trains and were not available. I have every prospect of having all dismounted men with the trains sent to the White House, and have officers there to take charge of horse or animal. Most of the new regiments and recruits mounted at Port Royal and other places were dismounted as soon as they joined me.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

44 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT III