War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0675 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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and if I may suggest, I would do so to the commanding general to hold on to his reserves when he has any till their need elsewhere is very apparent, for in my experience the rumors and fears of the picket-line are too apt to be transmitted up without due investigation. My men will be held at all times as ready as possible to move at once, but to be always ready is to be never ready, for men cannot stand with belts, knapsacks, &c., on all the time without being broken down.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 7, 1864-2 p.m.

Major-General WARREN:

Your dispatch received. There appears to be no probability at present of your being required to support General Burnside.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

JUNE 7, 1864-2.30 p.m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

General Griffin reports that he has driven the enemy over Sumner's Bridge, and had sent one or two men across. He lost a few men in getting it. One of General Cutler's brigades has taken possession of this end of the railroad bridge and lost a few men. The enemy fired a great deal with artillery. The railroad bridge is said to be cut and burned. The enemy is intrenched on the opposite side. A considerable cloud of dust was seen, indicating a movement of troops by the enemy. We may be able to cross the stream, but do not know our prospects for advancing afterward.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

JUNE 7, 1864.

It is not desirable that General Warren should cross the river, but hold the crossing to prevent the enemy coming to this side.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

LEARY'S, June 7, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS:

I have the base of a shot fired from the iron-clad car on the railroad. It is a 32-pounder.

Respectfully,

G. K. WARREN,

Major-General.