War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0625 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 5, 1864-8.15 a. m.

Major-General SMITH:

I am awaiting your report of last night's operations and progress.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 5, 1864-11.30 a. m. (Received 11.35 a. m.)

Major General W. F. SMITH,

Commanding Eighteenth Corps:

The major-general commanding directs me to inform you that Major-General Burnside will be withdrawn and take position from your right, near Mrs. Thomas' [Thompson's?], along the main branch of the matedequin, past Allen's Bridge, toward the Old Church road. General road. General Warren will be withdrawn altogether. General Burnside is directed to make careful examinations in the vicinity of your right for the establishment of his left and his connection with you.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

PRIVATE.] HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS,

June 5, 1864.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I wish to explain a point to you which I think you will comprehend. It will also be explanatory of my call this p. m. Your telegram says: "Major-General Burnside will be withdrawn to-night and take position from your right, near Mrs. Thomas', along the main branch of the Matadequin, past Allen's Bridge, toward the Old Church road. General Warren will be withdrawn altogether. General Burnside is directed to make careful examinations in the vicinity of your right for the establishment of his left and his connection with you." This in a telegram to General Smith. The only map we had to give us information regarding the new line I send to you. Nothing was indicated there that General burnside would hold on our right, as is now proposed, nor does the map we have show the true line. The line, the map I have sent you, shows a decidedly acute angle for the new line, breaking nearly short off on the right of our line. You will see from this why I came over from General Smith to make some explanation of our position, thinking there might be some misapprehension somewhere. I write this of my own accord solely, and to justify my mission from General Smith, which I know you will appreciate.

I am, general, very respectfully, &c.,

N. BOWEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

40 R R-VOL XXXVI, PT III