War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0618 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 5, 1864-3.30 a. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

Your dispatch concerning the relieving of part of Eighteenth Corps was received. Everything is satisfactory.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General. Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864. (Received 4.10 a. m.)

Major-General BURNSIDE:

I thought it was understood that the lines which my troops occupy were not to be occupied by yours, and that the new lines which you were to take up would shorten yours, besides bringing my own troops already there in excess. I did not, therefore, think it necessary for these troops to wait to be relieved by others when I ordered them away.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864.

General BURNSIDE:

If you will put your left where you said you would, it would shorten your present line and therefore be more easily held, besides making the whole line continuous and stronger. I cannot afford to straddle that swamp, for I cannot communicate with sufficient facility. Ask for the chief engineer of the army to come and settle the matter, if you do not like the plan to which you agreed yesterday.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864-10.25 [a. m.].

General MEADE,

Commanding the Army of the Potomac:

I omitted to report to you yesterday that the indications on the ground evacuated by the enemy yesterday in our front shows, that their loss in the fight of Thursday evening and Friday was very severe-many of the dead were left unburied, and such as were buried were scarcely covered. They lost a large number of battery horses, one caisson blown up, and one abandoned. Our loss in the two fights was very severe-Thursday night our loss was 350 and on Friday about 1,000. I hope to send you accurate returns to-day. Our men on both of these occasions behaved with great coolness and gallantry and are now in good spirits and condition. The work in advance of General Smith's old right is nearly finished, and we are endeavoring to gain a position about 80 or 100 yards beyond the advance line of General Birney yesterday, which will place us on a ridge that commands the enemy's skirmish pits and enable us to push our approaches with greater facility. We shall try to get some artillery