War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0617 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS SIXTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 126. June 5, 1864.

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2. The First Delaware Cavalry Regiment (serving and armed as infantry) is assigned to Brigadier-General Russell, commanding First Division and will report accordingly.

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By command of Major-General Wright:

M. T. McMAHON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864-1.30 a. m.

Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff:

Do not think it will be well to open fire from my front. We arrived too late to establish batteries, and besides we are now carrying wounded over roads which would be right under the return fire of the enemy.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864- 2 a. m. (Received 3.10 a. m.)

General MEADE:

I have expected that telegraphic communication would be re-established before this otherwise would have sent this by an orderly. Last night in riding over the ground with General Smith I found the that new position he pointed out for a position of my troops was in advance of his corps, instead of the division of General Birney, thereby relieving a portion of the Eighteenth Corps, which I was not ordered to do. I did not know that such was the case until just as I was riding off the ground, and as I was ordered to relieve General Birney and connect with General Smith, and at the same time hold as much of my force in reserve as possible, I decided to relieve Birney first, which took the division of Willcox and Potter, Birney's division being larger both of them. Notwithstanding I was not ordered to relieve any portion of Smith's corps, I deemed it best, under the circumstances, to put in this new position a portion of Crittenden's division which did not arrive until after dark. Major Morton reported to General Smith for that purpose, and was told by the general that he had better not commence the work until daylight. I shall put a force there at daybreak, unless otherwise ordered. Am I right? It was impossible for Major- Morton to commence his approach understandingly last night, as it was so dark he could not see and was a stranger to the ground, and besides no working parties had been formed-we not having expected to be called upon for such work in this section of the line until after night-fall. We commence at daylight in the morning.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.