War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0607 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 5, 1864-6 p. m.

Major-General HANCOCK,

Commanding Second Corps:

Your dispatch of 5 p. m. received. I am directed by the commanding general to say that it is not practicable to relieve a portion of Gibbon's line by extending the line of the Sixth Corps. General Warren reports that he has been obliged to open a portion of his line to strengthen another part threatened by the enemy. Now that Birney's division has joined you, the commanding general decides that you must rely upon your own command to hold your line.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864-7.10 p. m.

General WILLIAMS:

Colonel Lyman sends word that he has communicated with the enemy, and is waiting to know hoes soon he will be received.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864-[9.10 p. m.]

General WILLIAMS:

There has been very animated musketry and artillery fire, apparently commencing on General Wright's left or on my right and running to my left. No damage, apparently, has resulted, but the details I am not yet advised of.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND ARMY CORPS,

June 5, 1864- [10.15 p.m.]

General WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

The musketry commenced to the right of General Gibbon then swept toward Wright and then back along Gibbon's whole front. On General Barlow's line there was hardly a shot fired. I have not had complete reports from General Gibbon. The First Delaware (dismounted) Cavalry, encamped near the cross-roads- I do not know who they belong to-got into some trouble. My provost guard formed along the road, caught the regiment, officers and men, but now, since the firing has ceased and quiet is restored, they have returned to their camps.

WINF'D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

P. S.- On the right the enemy fired on our pickets, who were entrenching themselves in the center. Colonel Smyth reports that