War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0599 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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army is not only confident of protecting itself without intrenchments, but that it can beat and drive the enemy wherever and whenever he can be found without this protection.

Very respectfully,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES, Cold Harbor, Va., June 5, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The object of the cavalry expedition to Charlottesville and Gordonsville is to effectually break up the railroad connection between Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley and Lynchburg. To secure this and they should go as far as Charlottesville, and work upon the Lynchburg branch and main line to Staunton for several miles beyond the junction. This done they could work back this way to where the road is already destroyed, or until driven off by a superior force. It is desirable that every rail on the road destroyed should be so bent or twisted as to make it impossible to repair the road without supplying new rails. After the work is accomplished, herein directed, the cavalry will rejoin the main army, keeping north of the Pamunkey until the position of the army is known to them. It may be found necessary to keep on the north side as far down as West Point. Instructions will be sent to General Hunter by the cavalry expedition. He will be required to join his force to General Sheridan's and return with him to the Army of the Potomac. If it is found practicable, whilst the cavalry is at the most westerly point reached by it, to detach a brigade or more to go over to the James River and destroy the canal, it will be a service well repaying for three or four days' detention.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

COLD HARBOR, VA., June 5, 1864-7 p. m. (Received 6th.)

Major-General HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

The object of sending troops to Mobile now would not be so much to assist General Sherman against Johnston as to secure for him a base of supplies after his work is done. Mobile also is important to us and would be a great loss to the enemy. Let the 100-days' men, such of them as you have to spare, move on.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 5, 1864-1.30 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

GENERAL: Any communication by flag of truce will have to come from you, as the enemy do not recognize me as in command whilst you are present.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.