War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0554 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, June 3, 1864.

General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Please send me two fresh batteries of rifled guns. It will save time and the danger of sending fresh men forward with ammunition. The sharpshooters trouble my batteries very much, I am obliged to keep my batteries in the same position and at work. My last four regiments that I have got for an assault are now forming for an attack, but I dare not order it till I see more hopes of success of be gained, either by General Warren's attack or otherwise.

Respectfully, &c.,

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, June 3, 1864.

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I was mistaken in regard to the line of the Sixth Corps. When I went to the front Colonel French, Seventy-seventh New York, said he was in the front line. I had been some 300 yards in advance of that, but I now find he was mistaken. There is one of General Wheaton's regiments (One hundred and thirty-ninth Pennsylvania) on my left which is out of ammunition.

Respectfully, &c.,

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

This note was written before receipt of General Wright's note. I have about five regiments of General Brooks' command in a condition for assault. General Martindale has been so badly cut up in his assault that he says he is no longer fit for attack. I will do whatever can be done, or attempt whatever may be ordered. I have ordered all my troops available for the new column.

WM. F. SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH CORPS, June 3, 1864.

General HUNT,

Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: The general commanding corps directs me to say that he took all the artillery required from you, and at the same time informed your aide that all the ammunition our batteries had was what was brought in their chests. Some of the batteries of the corps have been firing three days without any fresh supply. Lieutenant Tucker, the general's aide, reports to him these words from you:

Tell Captain Elder he has used up more ammunition then the rest of the line, and if he continues to fire constantly, I cannot supply him with a sufficient quantity