War of the Rebellion: Serial 069 Page 0549 Chapter XLVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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our column of attack formed, but I think it was fortunate we were not allowed to advance. Our loss to-day has been quite heavy, particularly in officers.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, June 3, 1864-5 p. m.*

Major-General MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

After the attack of this morning, by which we carried the first line, our men were very close to the main line of the enemy's works, and it was very difficult to organize columns of attack, which caused much delay; and just as we were ready to attack the order came suspending offensive operations. The enemy, however, made an attack on our right a few moments before, an account of which I gave by the return of Captain Rosencrantz. Everything is now quiet in our front, but we are too close upon the enemy to intrench before dark. Our line on the right is a single one, but if the enemy give us an opportunity to intrench, we hope to hold it.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-5.40 p. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

Your dispatch of 5 p. m. is received. The commanding general desires to know whether you cannot contract your lines. There are no re-enforcements from any part of the army that can be sent you.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS, June 3, 1864-7 p.m .

General al WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

If you have any messages for General Wilson I will send them to him if you telegraph them here.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 3, 1864-7.30 p. m.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

We have nothing at present to send to General Wilson. It will not be necessary for the messenger to wait at your headquarters for dispatches from here.

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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*In answer to Meade's dispatch of 4.10 p. m. See p. 541.

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